Singin’ in the Rain (UK Tour) – Review

Singin’ in the Rain UK Tour: Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury

22nd March 2022

★★★★★

The classic musical hit Singin’ in the Rain is currently touring the UK. Featuring high-energy choreography, a stunning 20’s inspired set (including over 14,000 litres of water on stage) and glitzy costumes Singin’ in the Rain brings the smash hit 1952 movie to life. The story which is set in 1920’s Hollywood follows silent movie star Don Lockwood. Lockwood is at the height of his career but when the ‘talkies’ begin to take form a young chorus girl is set to change not only his heart but also the heart of Hollywood.

After a fantastic run in Chichester Festival Theatre, the West End and most recently at London’s Sadler’s Wells, this UK Tour does not hold back. Choreography by Andrew Wright is everything as you would expect and want from a classic musical – a mix of genres including ballet and tap whilst staying true to its 1920’s roots. Full of fancy footwork, high energy and fantastic timing it is performed brilliantly by every member of the cast. The tap sequences, in particular, are performed expertly leaving the audience out of breath, let alone the dancers themselves. Sam Lips has the audience in stitches in the outstanding title number ‘Singin’ in the Rain’. Whilst Ross McLaren impresses greatly during the song ‘Make ‘em Laugh’ with its clever choreography and movement. In fact, there is not a scene where McLaren does not steal centre stage with his enigmatic stage presence and charisma.

There are occasions when stunt casting is used to draw in audiences but this is not the case in this show. Faye Tozer shows that she is much more than just a popstar. Her characterisation and impressive accent bring Lina Lamont to life in the most energetic and outrageous way. Sam Lips is excellent as Don Lockwood. His voice matches that of Charlotte Gooch (Kathy Seldon) perfectly and he’s every bit the 1920s gentlemen. His dancing is superb with gorgeous lines and strong form. Charlotte Gooch as Kathy Selden is perfectly cast. Not only does she have the vocal strength and dance ability, but she is a natural on the stage bringing the character to life in the most believable way. Singin’ in the Rain is a very dance heavy show and therefore each member of the cast needs to have many strengths – this cast certainly do. The entire cast are always in character and what’s more look like they are thoroughly enjoying themselves.

Singin’ In The Rain features the glorious MGM score including ‘Good Morning’, ‘Make ‘em Laugh, ‘Moses Supposes’ and the legendary ‘Singin’ In The Rain’. The orchestra, led by musical director Grant Walsh sounds fantastic accompanying the dazzling dancing on stage. With such memorable music it is hard not to leave the auditorium at the end of the show humming along.

Boasting a simple yet effective set, gorgeous costumes and bright lights it is clear that a lot of time and money has gone into creating this piece. However, it is the water that steals the show. Without too many spoilers, you may want to take a rain mac if sitting in the front stalls. Not many shows can say they manage to flood the stage twice nightly! It takes a great team working tirelessly behind-the-scenes to enable this to happen but it is to great effect, with the audience absolutely loving it. Who knew rain could be this much fun?! Stop saving up for a rainy day and splash out your cash on tickets to see this spectacular show.

Singin’ in the Rain is running at the Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury until 26th March. For information and tickets click here. For information about the continuing tour click here.

Photo Credit: Manuel Harlan

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